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3 Auto Purchases That Originally Seemed Dumb But Were Actually Great

As cars become more advanced and more complicated, there are a few auto purchases that seemed awful, but weren’t. 

Many automotive technological advances have occurred in recent years, and are only continuing to happen.

In the midst of this, there are quite a few that came across as dumb and awful, but turned out to be quite good cars in hindsight.

Here are three examples of some of those cars.

3. Saab 9-3

The Saab 9-3 was a good car, but if you were using facts and figures to buy a luxury sedan, you’d have likely ended up with a Mercedes C-Class or the BMW 3-Series. All three cars were in the same price bracket, though the Saab had less power than the Merc or the BMW.

Still, it had a similar 0-to-60 time in the mid-six second range. They all had top speeds in the 155 to 160 miles-per-hour ballpark.

The Saab’s lack of popularity was mainly due to it only being available with front-wheel and all-wheel drive. It performed as well as its German competitors, but it didn’t sell as well due to its drivetrain, and the fact that it didn’t have a three-pointed star on the front.

As a result, you can find a 9-3 with relatively low miles for under $10,000. A great buy for someone looking for something a little different.

2. Volkswagen Karmann Ghia

The Karmann Ghia was never as famous as the car upon which it was based, the Volkswagen Beetle.

Initially, it was frowned upon for being based on the mundane Volkswagen Beetle, though its beautiful bodywork swayed many people the right way.

Nowadays, it’s a well-loved classic that is relatively inexpensive. No, it isn’t particularly fast or sporty, but it is one of the most beautiful cars ever made.

1. Lexus LFA

The Lexus LFA is undoubtedly one of the world’s most misunderstood cars. A lot of blood, sweat, and tears went into building this car.

Powered by a bespoke 4.8-liter V10 engine, it could rev from idle to 9,000 RPM in just .6 seconds. It produced 552 horsepower, the same amount as the contemporary Lamborghini Gallardo.

The LFA went from 0 to 60 miles per hour in just 3.6 seconds, and onto a top speed of 202 mph. It was obviously a force to be reckoned with by its Italian and German rivals.

There were two things that caused its initial lack of popularity. Number one, its price tag. It retailed for a whopping $375,000, a staggering $187,100 more than the base model rear-wheel drive Gallardo at the time, which retailed at $187,900.

The second thing that caused it to be unpopular was its badge. Nobody was going to pay close to $400,000 for a car that was built by the same people that made the Toyota Prius. If it had a prancing horse or a three-pointed star on the front, it would be much better regarded than it is now.

Nowadays, however, the LFA is becoming more and more popular, and is appreciating in price; LFA’s are rising well over the $400,000 mark now. Yes, it’s expensive for a car built by Toyota, but in the end it is a fantastic car unlike none other.

NEXT: RED FLAGS TO LOOK FOR WHEN BUYING A USED CAR