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CEO of Ferrari Claims Electric Cars May Not Be as Clean as They Appear

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The environmental benefits of electric vehicles have been disputed since their introduction to the market.

Sergio Marchionne, CEO of Ferrari, is skeptical of the cleanliness of electric cars.

He argues that, while the car itself is not necessarily producing any emissions, the processes by which batteries are produced and electricity is generated do, and are worse for the environment than any normal car.

Ferrari CEO suggests electric cars may not be as clean as they seem from CNBC.

He states, “I think that if you don’t do the full analysis of what the origin of the electrical power is, where it comes from, how you get batteries into these cars, what the cost is in terms of CO2 and the environment, I think the analysis that we are going to save the planet with electric cars is nonsense.”

Marchionne makes a valid point. The whole planet is more reliant on fossil fuels than renewable resources.

Now, if we, as a planet, moved toward nuclear power and other “clean” energy sources, electric cars could be less harmful to the environment than petrol and diesel-powered vehicles. He states, “If the base of that electrical production is nuclear, then I have zero issue… If you are relying on fossil fuels to produce it [electricity], I think the issue is much bigger.”

Marchionne is not a fan of electric cars, and he doesn’t try to hide it. Ferrari has not publically announced plans for an electric car for the foreseeable future.

Given that many European countries are looking to ban the sale of petrol and diesel-powered vehicles, this could possibly change in the next few years, if not sooner. For better or for worse, electric cars are becoming more and more popular, and society seems to believe that they will save the earth when this is not the case.

Hopefully Ferrari, along with other automakers, will continue to stand their ground and not produce electric cars.

NEXT: THE NETHERLANDS WILL BAN PETROL AND DIESEL CARS BY 2030

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